Gas Grills – Propane or Natural Gas?

Gas grillIf you’ve been grilling for some time, you’re probably familiar with your fuel choices of either propane or natural gas.  Typically, neither one is really better than the other; both cook and heat just fine.  The differences are in price, availability, and ease of use.

Practical Propane

Liquid propane, often referred to as LP, actually fuels about 80% percent of all the grills in the United States. It’s easy to see why. Propane is portable and easy to get. It comes in a reusable tank that you can pick up and leave in most major grocery stores and home goods stores like Home Depot, and it fits neatly underneath the grill.  They connect directly to your grill using a twist on connector that seals the connection with a snap.  The tanks are refillable too.  You can usually return your tank to the place where you bought it for a new filled tank, or get them refilled at a propane distributor.  Depending on your BTU‘s a common 20lb tank can last you about 25 hours of grilling time.

Consistent Natural Gas

Natural gas grills is about 15% of the gas grill market.  Using natural gas, you tap directly into a  gas fuel supply, such as the one in your home, or one supplied by your city or state.  Usually it’s the same supply used to fuel your furnace, stoves or gas heated dryers.  Your local utility company or a certified natural glass supplier can install the necessary connections that you can easily use gas.   A natural gas connection is very consistent.  It ensures that you won’t run out of fuel in the middle of cooking or heating, but  it does require that your grill remain in an area somwhere near the connection.  Moving your grill around is pretty difficult after that.  Some natural gas grill owners often use longer or extended gas lines so they can move their grill around, but that has to be done very carefully and not recommended for casual grill enthusiasts.

Their convenience and easy use make gas grills a popular choice over charcoal grills, however, choosing between natural gas and propane often comes down to the difference between carrying and refilling heavy propane tanks or paying to install a natural gas connection in your backyard. Choose what’s best for you, and enjoy grilling up juicy steaks and great burgers.

Some Quick Tips when Grilling

Grilling is hot work.  Remember to stay cool and drink plenty of water while grilling.  If you’re out in the sun, make sure to grab yourself some shade, like a patio umbrella.  The combination of sun and grill heat can knock you down.

3 Responses to “Gas Grills – Propane or Natural Gas?”

  1. Best Propane Grills

    Thanks for the tips, I actually had no idea what the ratio was between propane users and natural gas users. I personally opt for propane because I don’t like to be stuck in one location close to where natural gas enters the house. I love grilling, but sometimes I just have to use good old charcoal briquets.

    Reply
  2. Randal Coon

    Which is CHEAPER, Propane or Natural Gas…in Louisiana over the Haynesville Shale?

    Reply
  3. I want to add a gas grill in along with my charcoal grill. I have natural gas in my home and hooked up a previous gas grill to it in the past. What I want to know (and do) is what small size grill can I purchase that will be able to run off that home natural gas setup without hurting it. I want to stay away from any propane tanks of any size. Jim

    Reply

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